The irony of injunctions to prevent nuisance and annoyance

Imagea

An IPNA; an injunction to prevent nuisance and annoyance. Not yet law but something in which the government is set on implementing in the Antisocial Behaviour, Crime and Policing Bill. The IPNA is set to replace the pre-existing ASBO (Anti-social behaviour order); however, in doing so the goalposts are being immeasurably widened. Continue reading

Advertisements

False and misleading information: When will it end?

Image

This article intends to discuss the numerous ‘false and misleading figures’ in which the current government have been accused of using.

The issue was highlighted this week following the UK Supreme Court ruling in R (on the application of Reilly and another) v Secretary of State for Work and Pensions [2013] UKSC 68. The outcome? Here are the two versions, the first an independent writer, the second a government statement: Continue reading

Juxtaposing secret courts and the rule of law

Image

On the 25th April 2013 The Justice and Security Act 2013 introduced so-called “secret courts” (Closed Material Procedures) into ordinary civil cases in Britain for the first time.

Closed Material Procedures (or “CMPs”) mean that one party is not able to take part in either part or the whole of a trial. This party will almost always be a party who is bringing a claim against a government agency. In such a case the government and its lawyers will be present during the CMP, however, Continue reading

Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act: A proportionate response or a war on human rights?

Image

Schedule 7 of the Terrorism Act 2000 came into force on the 19th February 2001. 12 years later and its use is widespread; 61,145 people were held under the provisions in 2012-13 alone.[1] The provisions of Schedule 7 are extremely controversial and have held a prominent place in the media recently after the whole ‘Miranda’ affair. Mr Miranda is the partner of Glenn Greenwald, a journalist with the Guardian newspaper. He has made a series of controversial disclosures on US and British spying capabilities based on information from the former US intelligence employee Edward Snowden.[2]

Continue reading

A blog about Urban Lawyers

Image

Many of you may have already come across some previous Urban Lawyers blog posts. Some of you may be avid followers of the Urban Lawyers blogs and always patiently anticipate the next. However, how many of you could describe what Urban Lawyers do? As a result, the purpose of this blog post is to not only explain what Urban Lawyers do, but to provoke discussion based around the challenges which are faced by such an organisation.

Urban Lawyers has grown into a multipurpose organisation over the last 24 months Continue reading

Employment Law: Know your rights

Image

This article aims to educate and impart knowledge in relation to employment law. If you are employed it is important that you know your rights. Many employees can forgo rights they are entitled to simply because they are unaware of them. This article does not intend to provide a comprehensive list of rights available, but simply highlight a few which can be overlooked. Things you should be aware of:

  • Are you being paid the minimum wage? The minimum wage is currently £6.19 per hour. This rises to £6.31 from the 1st October 2013. E.g. You receive an annual salary of £15,000; You work 47 hours a week. This is equivalent to being paid £6.14 per hour which is below the minimum wage. Continue reading

Legal aid changes: An update

Image

 

Since the last post on this subject there has been a number of interesting developments regarding the proposed changes to criminal legal aid.

First, the e-petition reached over 100,000 signatures. This was an amazing achievement which meant the threshold for sparking a parliamentary debate was passed. This was the initial view, however, subsequent events may have dampened this achievement somewhat.

The proposals to criminal legal aid and the opposition to them aroused interest from the Justice committee; the Justice Committee was appointed by the House of Commons to examine the expenditure, Continue reading